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   Welcome to the Frampton Irish Blog. I will try to provide a blog edition each month. Each edition will have a theme. I will try to include such items as updated information on my research activities, new things I am learning, interesting tidbits on Frampton Irish persons and families, and occasionally some research tips. If I present questions and issues to you, and you have answers or comments, I invite your feedback either on the guest book or if you prefer by email to me at dbmack11@aol.com.

Neillsville Colony Jan 16, 2014

As I have been working on final edits to my book on the “History and Genealogy of the Frampton Irish” I realized that although I have written blog articles on several of the places that the Frampton Irish migrated to, I had not written anything about the very large migration to Central Wisconsin in the areas that surround Neillsville, Wisconsin.  This is the the Neillsville colony.  This is a great story of chain migration that includes my own ancestors.


The story of this migration starts with Robert Ross.  Robert Ross would be the earliest of the Frampton Irish to relocate to Clark County, Wisconsin and would ultimately find his fortune there and would serve to attract many other Frampton Irish families to the area.  Robert Ross was born on the Island of Mauritus in 1819.  Which is an island nation in the Indian Ocean.  His parents were Robert Ross and Margaret Keefe.  His father was born in County Carlow, Ireland and he was an officer in the British Navy.  So it could be said that this Ross family was quite worldly.  His father and his family went to Lower Canada in about 1831 where he settled on a farm in Concession St. Edouard in Ste. Marguerite.  Robert Ross, Senior also had some connections to land in Cranbourne Township, since he was a British Military pensioner.  Robert Ross, Junior, married Ellen Nugent in Quebec City on March 22, 1843.  Their first two children were born in Quebec City where Robert Ross was employed as a carter.  Robert Ross arrived in Clark County, Wisconsin in 1848 after spending a short time in Illinois. The first three years he made shingles, which was then a good business, as shingles were a legal tender. He was one of the original pioneers of Clark County and was identified as a resident of the County in November 1854.  Robert Ross settled on a farm in Pine Valley that was later known as “Ross’ Eddy.” Robert Ross and his family are found in the 1860 census in Pine Valley.  He was identified as engaged in lumbering and farming, his brother Henry Ross was also living in his household. In the latter 1860's, the three principal logging operators in Clark County were Hewitt, Woods & Co., Leonard R. Stafford, and Robert Ross.  Hewitt, Woods & Co. would cut and bank each winter from twelve to eighteen million feet of saw logs.  Stafford and Ross would each cut and bank from one-half to two-thirds of that amount.  Robert Ross’ brother Henry Ross was also a lumberman in the Neillsville area. Henry Ross was mustered into the Union Army with Company I, 14th Wisconsin in Neillsville, in 1861. He served as a Corporal until he was wounded in the Battle of Shiloh, Tennessee, in  1862 and died 11 days later.  After her husbands death in Ste. Marguerite in 1866, Robert Ross’ mother Margaret Keefe Ross went to Neillsville to live with him. In 1868, Robert Ross had built a fine residence about two miles south of Neillsville. It is a two story frame house, 32 x 34 ft., with a south wing, 20 x 32 ft. It was built by Simpson & Eyerly, an example of architectural proficiency. Robert Ross attended the annual meeting of the Black River Logging Association in February 1869. Robert Ross and his family are found in the 1870 census in the 3rd ward of La Crosse, Wisconsin where he was a lumberman. In the autumn of 1874, Robert Ross returned to his farm at Neillsville.  Robert Ross’ mother Margaret Keefe Ross died in 1873.  Her funeral was held at Robert Ross’ home.  Robert Ross was considered one of the wealthy men of the place, owning much valuable pine land. He introduced the first Shorthorn or Durham cattle into the county. Mr. Ross bought a red Durham bull called "Marius" from John Wentworth, then editor of the Chicago Democrat. "Marius" was sired by the 15th Duke of Avia, which sire Mr. Wentworth bought at the famous New York Mills sale at a purchase price of $15,000. Ross's Shorthorns were mostly the mellow roans and good milkers. At one time he had a sire nearly all white in color and which attracted much attention. This early herd of Shorthorns form the basis of the present native stock disseminated around Christie, Wisconsin.  Robert Ross later went to Alabama, but died in 1894 while at the home of one of his daughters in Minneapolis, Minnesota.  He was buried in Neillsville, Wisconsin.


One of Robert Ross’ brothers was Andrew Ross who was born in 1838 at Cranbourne.  Andrew Ross went to Clark County, Wisconsin in about 1869, probably to work for his brother Robert Ross.  Andrew Ross married Lucinda Garvin in 1875 at Pine Valley, Wisconsin. Lucinda Garvin was born in 1853 at Cranbourne and was the daughter of William Garvin and Sarah Jane Anderson who resided in Cranbourne.  Andrew and Lucinda Ross had three daughters.  Andrew Ross is listed in the 1880 census as a farmer in Pine Valley.  Andrew Ross died at his home in 1900 at Kansas City, Missouri. The remains of Andrew Ross were brought to Neillsville.  His funeral was held at the Congregational Church in Neillsville with Rev. G. W. Longenecker officiating. He was buried in the family lot.


Another brother of Robert Ross was John Ross who was born in 1841 in Ste. Marguerite.  John Ross was married in 1866 in the Frampton area to Mary Jane Johnston, who was the widow of Robert Sample.  Mary Jane Johnston was born in 1833 in Ste. Marguerite.  Her parents were David Johnston and Ann Beatty who resided in Concession St. Thomas in Ste. Marguerite. John and Mary Jane Ross had 2 children born in Ste. Marguerite.  John Ross came to Clark County in about 1869 to work for his brother, Robert.  John Ross settled in Neillsville.  He was foreman in the woods and river drives.  John and Mary Jane Ross had 2 more children in Neillsville. John Ross is listed in the 1880 census as a laborer in Neillsville, Wisconsin.  Living in his household at that time were his step children, Kate Sample and Johnny Sample, children of his wife Mary Jane by her first husband, Robert Sample.  John Ross is listed in the 1885 Wisconsin State Census as residing in Neillsville as head of a household of 6. John Ross was a laborer in Neillsville in 1900.  Mary Jane Ross, wife of John Ross died at their home in 1909 at Neillsville.  Her funeral was held at their home with Rev. N.F. Chapman of the Presbyterian Church officiating. She was buried in the family lot in the Neillsville cemetery.  John Ross died in 1926. His funeral was held at the Congregational Church in Neillsville. He was buried in the family lot in the Neillsville cemetery. 


William Garvin was born in County Cork, Ireland.  He served in the the 16th Regiment of Foot in the British Army during the Napoleonic Wars.  So much like Robert Ross, Senior, he was a “commuted pensioner” who was entitled to make a land claim in Canada. He and other pensioners selected land in Cranbourne Township to settled upon.  They came to Canada in 1832.  He was a tailor in Frampton in 1833, but soon movd onto his land in Cranbourne.  He and Margaret Gorey had been married in Ireland in about 1809.  They came to Canada with at least two children, with four more children born after their arrival.  Later reports indicated that they had 17 children. William Garvin, Senior, died in Cranbourne in 1869.  


Their son Thomas Garvin was married to Ellen Ross at Springbrook in 1851.  Ellen Ross was the daughter of Robert Ross, Senior and Margaret Keefe.  She was the sister of Robert Ross, Junior, the Clark County lumberman.  Thomas and Ellen Garvin had at least two children in Cranbourne before they went to the Neillsville, Wisconsin area in 1854.  They settled on land one mile west of Neillsville. Thomas Garvin is listed as a farmer with his family in the 1880 census in Pine Valley Township.  Thomas and Ellen Garvin had eight children. Thomas and Ellen Garvin moved to Seattle,Washington in 1902, apparently to live with their daughter Margaret Garvin Townsley.  Ellen Ross Garvin died in 1907 in Seattle, Washington.  Thomas Garvin also died in 1907, eight months later, in Seattle. 


Their son William Garvin, Junior, was married to Sarah Jane Anderson at Springbrook in 1850.  Sarah Jane Anderson was the daughter of Edward Anderson and Esther Watson of Standon Township.  They settled on a farm in range 8 of Cranbourne.  They had 11 children while living in Cranbourne.  William Garvin and his family moved to Clark County, Wisconsin in about 1874 and they settled on a farm in York Township. William Garvin, Junior, is listed in the 1880 census as a farmer in York Township.  Sarah Jane Anderson Garvin died in 1915 at Loyal.  William Garvin, Junrior, then went to live with his daughter Hannah Garvin Pickle in Antigo, Wisconsin.  William Garvin, Junior died in 1918 at Antigo.  The funeral services were in Antigo where he was buried.


Their mother Margaret Gorey Garvin is believed to have left Cranbourne for the Neillsville, Wisconsin area with her daughter Mary Ann Garvin (wife of Martin O’Brien) in about 1881.  She died at the home of her daughter Mary Ann Garvin O’Brien in York Township in 1899.  Although several of her family were known to be of the Anglican faith, she was reported to have been a devout Christian of the Catholic faith from an early age.  Her funeral services were held at St. Mary’s Church in Neillsville, with Rev. Bergner officiating.  She was buried in St. Mary’s Catholic Cemetery.


James Hughes was the son of William Hughes and Ann Carroll.  His father William Hughes was the Frampton Village Blacksmith.  James Hughes married Margaret Meagher at Frampton in 1835.  Margaret Meagher was the daughter of Lawrence Meagher and Mary Clary of County Tipperary, Ireland.  James Hughes established himself on a farm in range 3 of Frampton Township.  James and Margaret Hughes had 8 children while living in Frampton.  James Hughes and his family went to Clark County, Wisconsin in the fall of 1883 to join their sons and settled in Pleasant Ridge in Grant Township, Wisconsin.  James Hughes died at the residence of his son Michael in 1884, in Grant Township. His funeral was held at St. Mary’s Catholic Church in Neillsville with Rev. Father Voltz officiating.  Margaret Meagher Hughes died at her home in Pleasant Ridge in 1897.  The funeral was held at St. Mary's Catholic Church in Neillsville with Rev. Father A. J. Joerres officiating. She was buried in St. Mary’s Catholic Cemetery.


Their son John Hughes had gone to Clark County, Wisconsin in about 1862.  He was prominently identified with the lumbering industry. Later he resided on the Ridge on the farm owned by himself and brother, Michael.  He was married to Mary Lezotte in 1899 at Neillsville.  They had a daughter Mary Elizabeth who was born in 1899.  Mary Lezotte Hughes died in 1900.  John Hughes is found as a widower in the 1900 census in Grant Township.  The daughter Mary Elizabeth died in 1908.  John Hughes died at the home of his brother Patrick Hughes Weston Township in 1909.  His funeral took place at St. Mary’s Catholic Church with  Rev. A. Dorrenbach officiating.  He was buried in St. Mary’s Cemetery.


Their son William Hughes learned the blacksmith trade from his father and grandfather.  He went to Clark County, Wisconsin in about 1870.  He married Hannah Collins in 1872 at Sparta, Wisconsin.  He was a member of the Catholic Church.  He conducted his trade as a blacksmith in the lumber camps. Later they farmed along Pleasant Ridge in Grant Township. William Hughes set up his blacksmith business in a place called Kurth Corners.  His customers frequently ate a meal of Mother Hughes’ cooking, thrown in with a 15-cent job done at the smith. Needing a link welded in a chain or some similar small service, they were present when the summons came for Bill to come, as it was mealtime. So, as a matter of course, Bill invited his customer to eat, and Mother Hughes put on another plate. One, more or less, did not make much difference. She usually put on at least eleven.  There was also a tavern across the street from Hughes’ forge.  The farm was an important sideline for the Hughes family, mostly timber at first, but gradually coming under the plow as the Hughes boys cleared the land. To provide for the eleven members of the family and the steady stream of customer-guests, the Hughes boys were nursemaids to six or eight cows, a few hogs and an assortment of chickens. William Hughes is listed in the 1880 census as a farmer in Grant Township.  In the 1885 Wisconsin State Census he still resides in Grant Township as head of a household of 10.  In the 1900 census he is found as a blacksmith in Grant Township.  His daughter Margaret Hughes was listed in 1900 as a school teacher in Fremont Township of Clark County.  Margaret Hughes was a school teacher in several different places in Wisconsin and other parts of the West.  She even had one job at a Indian school in Laytonville, California for the Round Valley Indian Reservation.  William Hughes eventually accumulated upon his books some $3,000 of credit, which had been extended to his customers along with the free meals. He had never had time to be a good collector. William Hughes died at his home in the town of Grant in 1908.  His funeral was held at St. Mary’s Catholic Church in Neillsville.  He was buried in St. Mary’s cemetery.  Hannah Collins Hughes is found in the 1910 census residing with her son James in Grant Township.  After her son James married, she went to Montana at age 65 and took up a homestead claim near Union in Prairie County and proved it at the age of 70. She received patent to 320 acres in Prairie County, Montana in 1919.  Four of her children, John J. Hughes, Michael L. Hughes, Archie F. Hughes, and Margaret M. Hughes, would likewise prove up homestead claims in the same area of Montana. In the 1920 census, Michael, Margaret, and their mother Hannah were living in the household of John J. Hughes in School District number 6 of Prairie County, Montana.  Margaret Hughes married Michael Murphy in 1921 at Miles City, Montana.  They later went Alberta, Canada to homestead alongside some McLane families.  Hannah Hughes lived with her son John until she had a stroke and then returned to Clark County, Wisconsin to live with her son James.  Hannah Collins Hughes died in 1932.  The funeral was held at St. Mary’s Catholic Church in Neillsville with Rev. Peter Weber officiating.


Their son Michael Hughes went to Clark County, Wisconsin with his parents in 1883.  In the 1900 census he was single and was a farmer in Grant Township.  He died in 1928 and is buried in St. Mary’s cemetery in Neillsville.


Their son Patrick Francis Hughes went to Clark County in about 1870, and the following year he purchased his farm from the Fox River Lumber company.  He was a blacksmith by trade and spent many years in logging camps, working on Black River, Chippewa River, and their tributaries, and also helped build the Cameron dam of Dietz fame in the Thornapple River. He was one of the charter members of St. Mary’s Catholic Church in Neillsville and was its oldest member.  In the 1880 census, Patrick Hughes was a blacksmith in Colby, Wisconsin.  He returned to Frampton in 1884 and was married to Ellen Shea there.  Ellen Shea was the daughter of James Shea and Ellen Hughes of range 5 of Frampton Township.  Patrick and Ellen Hughes had three children.  Patrick Hughes is listed in th e 1885 Wisconsin State Census as residing in Weston Township as head of a household of 5.  In 1900 and 1910 he was listed as a farmer in Weston Township. In 1934, accompanied by his son William and daughter Mary, he made a trip back to Frampton, Quebec.   Patrick Francis Hughes passed away at his home in Weston Township in 1938.  His funeral services were held at St. Mary’s Catholic Church with Fr. J. A. Biegler officiating.  He was buried in St. Mary’s Catholic Cemetery.


In his biography narrative published in Wisconsin, it is reported that Martin Neville was born on November 11, 1841 in Tarkio, Missouri.  He was the son of Patrick Neville and Catherine Kelly who resided in Ste. Marguerite.  However, two Martin Nevilles are found among the baptism records recorded in the Frampton Parish register.  One Martin Neville was born at Frampton on on November 6, 1839 and another was born at Frampton on August 29, 1843.  If Martin Neville of Clark County, Wisconsin was truly born in Tarkio, Missouri this would yield a total of three Martin Nevilles born to Patrick Neville and Catherine Kelly.  It is much more likely that the Clark County Martin Neville was actually the one born on November 5, 1839 at Frampton.  He may have recalled the location of Tarkio, Missouri as a place of his infancy, as it is believed that the Patrick Neville family traveled to Tarkio, Missouri with the Martin Murphy family of Frampton to take up land in the “Platte Purchase.” The Nevilles lived there a few years but were frightened away by Indians and returned to Ste. Marguerite.  It is more probable that only Martin’s sister Anna Neville was born about 1842 in Tarkio, Missouri.  When Martin Neville was sixteen years of age he went to Maine, where he spent four years working in the woods and also loaded vessels with square timber. In the fall of 1859 he went to the Southern States, where he was engaged on a steamboat on the Mississippi and Missouri Rivers. In 1863 he went to Australia with a vessel loaded with pine and spruce lumber, and at Melbourne his captain sold the ship, after which he returned to Liverpool, England, and thence to Quebec in a sail vessel.  He then returned to Maine and worked again in the woods one winter, and the following spring went to Pennsylvania. In the fall of 1866 he went to Neillsville, Wisconsin and that winter worked for Robert Ross in his logging camp. In July he bought a claim of 160 acres, which he homesteaded.. He lived on this place seven years before proving it up.   Martin Neville returned to Quebec and was married to Mary Isabella Wright on July 29, 1869 at St. Patrick’s in Quebec City.  Mary Isabella Wright was born at Frampton in 1841.  He parents were James Wright and Marie Haslet who were residents of Ste. Marguerite. In 1875, Martin Neville was granted a homestead patent for 160 acres in Warner Township.  Martin Neville is listed in the 1880 census as a farmer in Warner. Martin Neville served as a school treasurer for 24 years and as a road overseer for several years. Martin Neville and his wife were members of St. Mary’s Catholic Church in Neillsville.  Martin and Mary Neville had nine children while living in Warner.  Mary Wright Neville died in 1884.


Patrick Neville and Catherine Kelly’s son Michael Neville was also reported in Clark County, Wisconsin sources as being born in Tarkio, Missouri.  However that is highly unlikely as his approximate birth year was 1847 and by that time his parents had already returned to Ste. Marguerite from Tarkio, Missouri.  Michael Neville married Anne Madden in 1867 at Ste. Marguerite.  Ann Madden was born in 1842 at Frampton.  She was the daughter of James Madden and Mary O’Connor who resided in Concession St. Thomas of Ste. Marguerite.  Michael and Anne Neville’s first 2 children were born in Ste. Marguerite.  Michael Neville and his family went to Clark County, Wisconsin in 1872 where their next four children were born.  He was first engaged in logging and river driving and later he bought a farm in Weston Township.  Michael Neville is listed in the 1880 census as a farmer in Weston Township. Michael Neville sold a 40 acre farm in Weston Township in 1882 to Hugh Tackney.  Hugh Tackney was a former neighbor of Michael Neville when they lived in Concession St. Thomas of Ste. Marguerite, Quebec. Michael Neville is listed in the 1885 Wisconsin State Census as residing in Weston Township as head of a household of 7.  He is listed in the 1900 census as a farmer in Weston Township.  Anne Madden Neville died at her home in 1902 the town of Weston.  Her funeral was held at St. Mary’s Catholic Church with Rev. Joseph Hauck officiating. Michael Neville died in 1913 at the home of his daughter.  He was a member of St. Mary’s Catholic Church where his funeral services were held.


Richard Free married his first wife Mary Ross in 1841 at Springbrook and they resided in Cranbourne Township.  Richard and Mary had three children.  Richard Free married his second wife Jane Parham in 1848 at Springbrook.  Richard Free was engaged in the boot and shoe trade and was also an extensive farmer. They lost their son Robert Free who died in the U.S. Civil War as a Union soldier.  They went to Clark County, Wisconsin in 1882 to join their sons and were engaged in farming in Weston Township. Richard Free died in 1889 and was buried in the Neillsville Cemetery.  Also in 1889, friends John Garvin and Arnold Free had done a little target shooting.  They returned to the store of Joseph Marsh in Spokeville, Wisconsin to clean their pistols.  Garvin's pistol went off and Arnold Free was shot. Free's brother, William, testified that it was a "pure" accident, and "He never knew of their having any trouble."  Dr. J. L. Bradfield had been called and sworn in after making the examination and gave this statement, "The person Arnold Free came to his death by a bullet from a revolver in the hands of John Garvin, he having full knowledge of the fact of said revolver being loaded. The cause of death was gross carelessness on the part of said John Garvin."   Arnold was buried in the Neillsville Cemetery alongside his father Richard and brother Alexander.


Richard Free and Mary Ross’ son Thomas Free left Cranbourne and went to Maine in 1865, where he worked on a farm for part of two summers.  Then he went to Bangor, Maine and worked in the ship-yards a short time and then went to work in the woods for the next two years. He went to Clark County, Wisconsin in 1867 and homesteaded there in 1871.  He was married to Eliza Schwamb in 1878 in Neillsville.  He received his homestead patent in 1878 for 120 acres in Weston Township.  Thomas Free is listed in the 1880 census as a farmer in Weston Township.  Thomas Free is listed in the 1885 Wisconsin State Census as residing in Weston Township as head of a household of 5.  Thomas Free is listed in the 1895 Wisconsin State Census as residing in Weston Township as head of a household of 9.  Thomas Free and his family are found in Weston Township in the 1900 census as well.  Thomas and Eliza Free had eight children.  Thomas Free served as clerk of the School Board eight years.  Thomas Free and his family went to Oregon after 1900 and he died in Marion, Oregon in 1908.  Widow Eliza Schwamb Free and her three youngest children are found in the 1910 census in Liberty, Oregon.


Richard Free and Jane Parham’s son Richard Free, Junior, went to Clark County, Wisconsin with his brother, William, in 1879. The first few years he worked for the Black River Improvement Co. He then purchased a 40 acre farm in Weston Township.  Richard Free is listed in the 1880 census as a farmer in Weston Township. In 1881, he was married to Hannah Armstrong in Chicago. Hannah Armstrong was also from Cranbourne and her parents were Michael Armstrong and Susan Matson.  Hannah first went to New York, and then to Chicago, where she worked for a time. They lived on the farm in Weston Township for several years and then moved to a farm in York.  For many years he was a member of the York Center Methodist Episcopal church and also of the Neillsville Odd Fellows Lodge.  Richard and Hannah Free had seven children.  Richard Free died in 1922.  The funeral was held at the M.E. church in Neillsville with Rev. W. T. Scott officiating and the local I.O.O.F. taking part in the ceremony. He was laid to rest in the Neillsville cemetery beside his father and two brothers, Alexander and Arnold.  After Richard’s death, Hannah Armstrong Free moved to a home she bought in Neillsville. Hannah Armstrong Free died in 1937.  Services were held Oct. 9 at Schiller's Funeral Home and York Center church with Rev. G. W. Longenecker officiated. Interment was in York Center cemetery.


Richard Free and Jane Parham’s son William Free came with his brother Richard Free to the Neillsville, Wisconsin area in 1879.  William Free is listed in the 1880 census as a carpenter in Hixon Township. In 1883, William Free returned to Cranbourne where he was married to Elizabeth Gertrude Wilson in 1883.  Elizabeth Wilson was the daughter of William Wilson and Mathilda Sample.  Like the Frees, this Wilson family were residents of Cranbourne.  Later in 1883,William Free completed  a fine house on Court Street in Neillsville. In 1888, William Free was part of the firm “Free Phillips” which was engaged in manufacturing mouldings, shingles, etc. on the corner of Seventh and Clay Streets in Neillsville, Wisconsin. The business had a forty-five horse power engine and employed eight to twelve men.  They were involved in the general contracting business for doing all kinds of woodwork. Their building was 45 X 50 feet and two stories high.  The firm did $5,000 to $7,000 worth of business per year and were among the prominent manufacturers of the Clark County.  Later, William Free left his business and returned to his carpentry trade. William Free and his family are found in the 1910 census in Neillsville.  William Free took an active part in civic affairs and served as city clerk and as an alderman in Neillsville.  He also worked as a janitor for the south side schools.  William and Elizabeth Free had eleven children. William Free died at Neillsville in 1935.  His funeral was held at the Masonic Temple.  Elizabeth Wilson Free died at Neillsville in 1940.


Richard Free and Jane Parham’s son John Henry Free went to the Neillsville are in 1883.  He was married to Margaret McMahon, of the town of York, Wisconsin in 1890.  In the 1900 census he was a foreman at a stave factory in the Village of Thorp, Wisconsin and he and Margaret had one child.  John Free and his family are found in the 1910 census in Stanley of Chippewa County, Wisconsin where he was an engineer in a lumber mill.  At the time of his brother Richard’s death in 1922, John Free was located in Shanghai, China.  John and Margaret free returned from Shanghai to the U.S. at San Francisco aboard the ship President Cleveland on April 30, 1925.  By the 1930 census he was located in Hazel Dell of Clark County, Washington.  John Free died in 1932 in Portland, Oregon. 


Edward Manes (or Means) married his first wife Jane Hodgson at Holy Trinity Anglican Cathedral in Quebec City in 1827.  Edward Manes settled on a farm in range 1 of Frampton Township.  Edward and Jane Manes had 6 children all born in Frampton.  Edward Manes married his second wife Mary Ann Paisley in 1840 at Springbrook. Mary Ann’s first husband was William Kell of Frampton.  Edward and Mary Ann Manes had 7 children all born in Frampton.  Edward Manes went to Neillsville, Wisconsin in about 1883.  They probably lived with their son Joseph Manes in Neillsville.  Edward Manes died in 1885 at Neillsville.  He was buried in the Neillsville Cemetery.  Mary Ann Paisley Manes was residing with her son Dudley Manes in 1891.  Mary Ann Paisley Manes died in 1897 and is also buried in the Neillsville Cemetery.
Dudley Baxter Manes was the son of Edward Manes and Mary Ann Paisley.  Edward Manes and Mary Ann Paisley resided in range 1 of Frampton Township.  They had a nearby neighbor whose name was Dudley Baxter.  That may have been where he got his name.  Dudley Manes learned the trade of stone mason in Quebec in 1862.  He worked at that for several years in Quebec during the summers and he worked in the woods in the winter. In 1865 he went to Ohio and was employed as a farm superintendent.  In 1867 he went to Clark County, Wisconsin.  For two years he worked in the woods, and then for seven years he superintended a logging camp for other parties. After that he began work for himself in the lumbering business. However this business lost $5,000 in one year.  Dudley Manes married Charlotte (Lottie) Emelia Ross in 1876 at Neillsville.  Charlotte Ross was the daughter of Clark County lumberman Robert Ross and Ellen Nugent.  Dudley and Lottie Manes had five children.  Dudley Manes is listed in the 1880 census as a lumberman in Neillsville.  His sister Johannah was living in his household in 1880.  Dudley Manes soon moved his family to Pine Valley, west of the Black River. Dudley Manes is listed in the 1885 Wisconsin State Census as residing in Pine Valley Township as head of a household of 13.  Dudley B. Manes owned and resided upon the farm known as the McIntosh farm for 21 years.  The farm was 245 acres located in section 16 of Pine Valley Township.  While living in Wisconsin, Dudley Manes had been in lumbering and running a mercantile business and general store in Neillsville.  In 1889 he was burned out, and over the ruins of his old home he has constructed a large and beautiful brick residence, costing more than $3,000.  Dudley Manes is listed in the 1900 census as a farmer in Neillsville, Wisconsin.  In 1902, Dudley Manes and his family moved to Ladysmith, Wisconsin where they lived for ten years. Then they returned to Neillsville and purchased a home on the north side.  Dudley Manes died in 1915 at his home on 13th St. North Side. The funeral was held at St. Luke’s Episcopal Church with Rev. Davis of Marshfield officiating.  He was buried in the Neillsville Cemetery. Charlotte Ross Manes died at Hudson, Wisconsin in 1933.  Her funeral was held at Neillsville, at the Lowe's Funeral Home.  She was buried in the Neillsville Cemetery.


Edward Manes and Mary Ann Paisley’s son William Manes went to Clark County, Wisconsin in 1868.  William Manes is listed as a single person in Loyal Township in the 1875 Wisconsin State Census.  He was married to Laura Taylor in 1876 at Warner, Wisconsin.  They had at least one child.  In the 1880 census he is a farmer in Loyal Township.  By the 1900 census he is listed as a widower working as a laborer in a lumber works in Arbor Vitae of Vilas County, Wisconsin.


Edward Manes and Mary Ann Paisley son Joseph Manes went to Clark County, Wisconsin in 1867.  Joseph Manes was married to Jennette McIntyre in about 1879.  They had at seven children.  Joseph Manes is listed in the 1880 census as a lumberman in Neillsville.  He is again found in Neillsville in the 1885 Wisconsin State Census.  By the 1900 census he and his family had moved to Fifield of Price County, Wisconsin where he was a day laborer.  Jennette McIntyre died in Fifield in 1902.  Joseph Manes is found with his children in Fifield where he was a farmer in the 1905 Wisconsin State Census.  He married his second wife Helen Simonson in 1911 at Ironwood, Michigan.  At that time he was listed as a lumberman.  Joseph Manes died in 1932 and is buried in the Forest Home Cemetery in Fifield, Wisconsin.


William and Mary (Maxwell) Haslett (or Heaslett) were both natives of County Armagh, Ireland.  They came to Lower Canada in about 1838.  They settled on a farm in range 7 of Frampton Township (East Frampton/St. Malachie).  They reportedly were living in the home of their son Maxwell Haslett in Eaton Township of Clark County, Wisconsin in about 1891.  By the times of their deaths they were again residents of Frampton.


Their son William Haslett was married to Margaret  Johnston in 1868, probably in East Frampton.  Margaret Johnston was the daughter of David Johnston and Ann Beatty who resided in Concession St. Edward of Ste. Marguerite.  They left for Clark County, Wisconsin in the fall of 1868.  He and Margaret had two children in Neillsville.  He worked for Hewett and Woods, helping to build the mill at Hewettville, the first M.E. Church in Neillsville and many other early buildings.  He also worked in camp for John Dwyer.  In about 1875 he went to work for Sam Green in the gun shop and later bought the shop and continued to run the business the rest of his life. Margaret Johnston Haslett died in 1875 and he then married Eliza Hutchinson at Neillsville in 1877.  William Haslett and his family are found in the 1880 census in Neillsville where he was a gunsmith.  Eliza died at Neillsville in 1882 and then he married Malvina Fuller at Neillsville in 1885.  William and Malvina Haslett had at least five children. William Haslett and his family are found in the 1900 census in Neillsville where he continued as a gunsmith.  William Haslett died in 1914, at his home on Fifth St. in Neillsville.  His funeral was held at the Presbyterian Church with officiating.  He was buried in the Neillsville Cemetery.


Their son Maxwell Haslett came to Neillsville, Wisconsin in the fall of 1868 (probably with his brother William Haslett).  He worked in the woods and in Hewitt’s mill for two years.  He continued a pattern of working in the woods during the winters, and drove logs and farmed in the spring and summers.  He settled on a farm of eighty acres in Eaton Township in the spring of 1878.  He married Emma Hewett later that same year.  He and Emma were members of the Methodist Church.  He is found in the 1900 census with his family in Eaton Township.  Maxwell Haslett and his wife Emma are found in the 1910 census still in Eaton Township.  Maxwell Haslett died in 1923 and is buried at the Loyal, Wisconsin cemetery.


David Johnston and Ann Beatty were married at Chalmers Presbyterian Church in Quebec City in 1832.  David Johnston settled on a farm in Concession St. Edward in Ste. Marguerite.  David Johnston and Ann Beatty apparently went to the Neillsville, Wisconsin area in about 1878 as David Johnston is found living in his son William’s household in Pine Valley Township in the 1880 census.  Further, they are buried in the Neillsville Cemetery, but their death dates are not listed.


Their son David Johnston, Junior, went to Neillsville, Wisconsin in 1868.  He married Myra Elizabeth Spencer in 1875 at Cleveland, Wisconsin.  David Johnston was a farmer in Garden Valley, Wisconsin in the 1880 census.  In the 1900 census, David Johnston was a farmer in Cleveland, Wisconsin.  David Johnston died in Cleveland, in Jackson County, Wisconsin in 1910.  His funeral was held at the his home.  He was buried in the Garden Valley Cemetery.


Their son William Johnston married Rowena Baxter in 1873 in Quebec. Rowena Baxter was the daughter of Dudley Baxter and Helen Grant of range 4 in Frampton Township.  In June 1873, they went to Neillsville, Wisconsin and settling on a farm in Pine Valley west of the city.  William Johnston and his family are found in the 1880 and 1900 census in Pine Valley where he was a farmer. William Johnston died in 1929 and is buried in the Neillsville Cemetery.  Rowena Baxter Johnston died at her home west of Neillsville in 1916.  Her funeral was held at her home with Rev. S.B. Pinney officiating. She was buried in the Neillsville Cemetery.


William Lightfoot was the son of Henry Lightfoot and Elizabeth Hodgson.  Although, William Lightfoor was born in London, England, two of his sisters, Catherine and Jenny were born in Frampton, where their grandparents, John Hodgson and Hannah Maria Brown were long time residents.   William Lightfoot’s father was a sea captain.  William Lightfoot’s parents died when he was young and the Lightfoot children were sent to live with their grandfather, John Hodgson in Frampton. In the 1861 Canada census he was living in the household of his sister Catherine Lightfoot Sargeant and her husband Edward Sargeant in Frampton. William Lightfoot went to Maine and New Brunswick in about 1861, spending two winters in the pine woods. In 1868 he came west to Neillsville, Wisconsin.  He first joined the lumber camp of George Crosby and for thirty-eight years he worked in the wood camps and on the river, being foreman eight winters. He then took up farming, buying eighty acres in Pine Valley Township.  He never married. William Lightfoot died in 1930.  His funeral was held at the Congregational church with Rev. G. W. Longenecker officiating. He was buried in Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin.


Patrick Bearny (or Barney) married Margaret Quigley in 1833 at Frampton.  Margaret Quigley was the daughter of James Quigley and Bridget Wafer.  Her brother James Quigley lived in lot 1 of range 1 of Frampton Township.  Patrick and Margaret resided in Concession St. Alexander of Ste. Marguerite.  They had at least 13 children while living in Ste. Marguerite.  They went to Eau Claire County, Wisconsin in about 1874. After that they began being known as the “Barney” family.  Patrick Bearny and his wife and William and Andrew Bearny are listed in the 1880 census in Seymour Township of Eau Claire County, Wisconsin. Patrick Bearny died near Eau Claire sometime after that.  Margaret Quigley Bearny died in Eau Claire in 1899.


Their son Thomas Barney first went to Moose River, Maine where he was married to Harriet Holden in 1860.  At least three children were born to them in Maine.  He and his family moved on to Eau Claire, Wisconsin in about 1873.  Three more children were born to them there.  He received a land patent to 61.12 acres in Township 27 north and Range 7 west of Eau Claire County, Wisconsin in 1878. He and his family are found in the 1880 census in Seymour Township, Eau Claire County, Wisconsin.  Thomas Bearny died in 1885 in Sandstone, Minnesota.
Their son James Bearny left Ste. Marguerite around 1854 going first to Moose River, Maine.  He was a laborer in Moose River in 1860.  He was married to Clementine Moore in 1864. Their first three children would be born in Moose River.  By 1873 they were in Seymour, Wisconsin where there subsequent children were born.  James Bearny received a land patent to 80 acres in Township 27 north and Range 7 west of Eau Claire County, Wisconsin in 1878. James Bearny and his family are found in the 1880 census in Seymour Township, Eau Claire County, Wisconsin.  James Bearny was still a farmer but he had moved to Anson in Chippewa County, Wisconsin by the time the 1900 census was taken.  James Bearny died in Chippewa Falls in 1917.


Their son John Bearny was first married to Elizabeth Madden and they had three children in Ste. Marguerite.  They went to Eau Claire, Wisconsin in about 1875.  At least one child was born to John and Elizabeth Bearny in Eau Claire in 1878.  After his first wife died he was married to Katherine McNamara in 1882.  He was listed as a laborer in Chippewa Falls in 1900.  He and Katherine had at least four children in Chippewa Falls, one of whom later became a priest.


Their son Patrick Bearny was married to Elizabeth Neville at St. Marguerite in 1869.  Elizabeth Neville was the daughter of Patrick Neville and Catherine Kelly of Concession St. Thomas in Ste. Marguerite.  Patrick Bearny and his family are found in the 1870 census in Moose River, Somerset County, Maine.  Patrick Bearny and Elizabeth went to Eau Claire, Wisconsin in about 1873.  Patrick Bearny and his family are found in the 1880 census in Seymour Township, Eau Claire County, Wisconsin where he was a farmer.  Elizabeth Neville Bearny died in 1918 in Chippewa Falls.  Patrick Bearny died in 1926 in Detroit, Michigan while he was there to visit his sons William, Martin, and George. Michael Bearny went to Detroit to accompany his father’s body back to Chippewa Falls for burial.


John Tackney and his wife Mary McCabe came to Lower Canada from Ireland in the 1830s.  They settled in Concession St. Thomas in Ste. Marguerite.  They had three children while living in Ste. Marguerite.  Their son Hugh Tackney married Catherine McLane in 1874 in Ste. Marguerite.  She was the daughter of James McLane and Anastasia O’Connor of Concession St. Alexander in Ste. Marguerite.  Hugh and Catherine Tackney had 2 children born in Ste. Marguerite.  Hugh Tackney went to Clark County, Wisconsin in 1879.  Hugh Tackney is listed in the 1880 census as a farmer in Weston Township.  Hugh Tackney purchased a 40 acre farm in Weston Township from Michael Neville for $475.00 in 1882. Michael Neville was a former neighbor of Hugh Tackney when they lived in Concession St. Thomas of Ste. Marguerite.  Hugh Tackney is listed in the 1885 Wisconsin State Census as residing in Weston Township a head of a household of 6.  Listed next to him in that census was his father John Tackney as head of a household of 2.  His parents apparently joined him in Weston between 1881 and 1885.  In 1889, Hugh Tackney was working on a log drive on the Black River for the Coleman Lumber Company above the dam on Rock Creek.  He was riding a log which was caught in the current, carrying him through the spillway and plunging man and log beneath the boiling flood.  Two weeks later his body was found by Miles Murphy a mile or more down the creek completely buried in Edmunds’ sandbar, except for two buttons on his clothes which were shining in the sun.  His widow Catherine McLane Tackney married widower William Murphy in 1891 at Neillsville.  She died in 1902 at Weston.  Her funeral was held at St. Mary’s Catholic Church with Rev Father Hauck officiating.  She was buried in the St. Mary’s Catholic Cemetery in Neillsville.


Thomas Sargeant was the son of William Sargeant and Margaret Hurley of range 7 of Frampton Township (East Frampton/St. Malachie).  He was born in East Framtpon in 1852.  He went to Chippewa Falls, Wisconsin in about 1880.  He is listed in the 1885 Wisconsin census as a single person in Chippewa Falls.  He married Rene Phillips at Eagle Point, Chippewa County, Wisconsin in 1887.  They had three children in Chippewa Falls.  Thomas Sargeant and his family are found in the 1900 census in Chippewa Falls where he was a timber estimator.  By the 1905 Wisconsin State Census he was listed as a widower timber cruiser boarding in another household in Chippewa Falls.  He was identified as a resident of Chippewa Falls in the 1909 obituary of his sister Sarah A. Sargeant Holmes.  Sarah Sargeant Holmes and her husband John C. Holmes had briefly lived in Eau Claire, Wisconsin from 1880 to 1885.


John McLane was the son of James McLane and Anastasia O’Connor of Concession St. Alexander of Ste. Marguerite.  He was married to Elizabeth Murphy in 1875 at Ste. Marguerite.  Elizabeth Murphy was the daughter of Miles Murphy and Bridget O’Farrell of Ste. Marguerite.  They had five children while living in Ste. Marguerite.  After his father’s death, John McLane and his family went to Clark County, Wisconsin in October 1882.  This migration coincided with the movement of most of the Miles Murphy family to the same location . John McLane purchased a farm of 40 acres in Weston Township from his brother-in-law William Murphy.


John McLane is listed in the 1885 Wisconsin State Census in Weston Township as head of a household of 8.  John McLane and Elizabeth Murphy McLane had seven more children in Weston Township.  John McLane is listed in the 1900 census as a farmer in Weston Township.  John and Elizabeth McLane retired from farming in 1914 and moved to a home in Marshfield, Wisconsin.  Elizabeth Murphy McLane died in 1917.  Around 1925, John McLane went to live with his daughter Bridget (Sarah) McLane and her husband in Kansas City, Missouri.  John McLane died in Kansas City, Missouri in 1929.  John McLane and Elizabeth Murphy McLane are buried in the Marshfield cemetery.  John and Elizabeth McLane’s sons James and Miles McLane were working in the woods of Taylor County, Wisconsin in 1900.  James McLane and his brother Moses went on to homestead in Acadia Valley, Alberta.  Moses later was one of the first to homestead in Crooked Creek, Alberta.  Miles McLane homesteaded near Sherwood, North Dakota and became a respected business owner and civic leader in that town.   John and Elizabeth McLane’s daugter Helen McLane married Louis Eckes at Marshfield, Wisconsin in 1910.  While most of the McLane children had scattered throughout the continent, Helen and her husband made their home on Marshfield.


Miles Murphy was the son of Frampton’s first settler Andrew Murphy and his second wife Elizabeth McMahon.  He married Bridget O’Farrell in 1848 at Frampton.  Bridget O’Farrell was the daughter of Michael O’Farrell and Elizabeth Doran of Frampton.  Miles Murphy and Bridget O’Farrell settled on a farm in Concession St. Edward of Ste. Marguerite.  They had eleven children while living there.  Bridget O’Farrell Murphy died in 1880 and was buried in the Frampton Cemetery.  Miles Murphy and his sons were often employed in the lumber industry in Maine and other parts of the United States.  In 1882, Miles Murphy and his family went to Neillsville in Clark County, Wisconsin.  He helped several of his family members to buy farms in the area.  In 1882, he loaned $125.00 to his son-in-law John McLane.  In 1883, he loaned $200.00 to his son William Murphy.  Again in 1884, he loaned William $67.00.  Miles Murphy later lived on a farm of his own in Weston Township near his sons and daughters.  Miles Murphy died in 1900 and is buried in the St. Mary’s Catholic cemetery in Neillsville.


Their son Andrew Murphy married Bridget Donahue in 1882 at Frampton.  Bridget Donahue was the daughter of Moses Donahue and Bridget Fitzgerald of range 5 of Frampton Township.  Andrew Murphy and his young bride left for the Neillsville, Wisconsin area in 1882 with his father and siblings.  They went to La Crosse, Wisconsin.  Andrew Murphy is listed in La Crosse with a household of four in the 1885 Wisconsin State Census.  Andrew and Bridget Murphy had six children.  Andrew Murphy was a foreman on the Black River for about 25 years.  He was also a foreman for the Coleman and John Paul Mills in La Crosse, Wisconsin. By the 1895 Wisconsin State Census, Andrew Murphy’s household in La Crosse had increased to seven persons.  Andrew Murphy and his family are found in the 1900 census in La Crosse where his occupation was listed as riverman. Andrew Murphy was a street foreman on the north side of La Crosse the last few years of his life. In the 1905 Wisconsin State Census, Andrew Murphy was a city foreman in La Crosse.  Andrew Murphy died in 1906 at his home on Charles Street in La Crosse.  His funeral was at St. James Church with Rev. Ambrose Murphy officiating.  Bridget Donahue Murphy and her family are found in the 1910 census in La Crosse.  Bridget Donahue Murphy died in 1916 at La Crosse.  


Their son Michael Murphy came to the Neillsville, Wisconsin area with his father and siblings in 1882.  In the 1900 census he was living in the household of his brother-in-law John McLane in Weston Township and his occupation was shown as a woodsman.  In 1902, Michael Murphy entered a homestead claim near Sherwood, North Dakota. By 1920, Michael Murphy was a lodger in Sherwood, North Dakota.  Michael Murphy died in 1923 at St. Paul, Minnesota after traveling there to seek treatment for cancer.


Their son Thomas Murphy came to the Neillsville, Wisconsin area with his father and siblings in 1882.  He went on to La Crosse, Wisconsin where he was married to Mary Garrahan in 1883.  They had at least three children in La Crosse.  He is found in the 1885 Wisconsin State Census in the first ward of La Crosse. 


Their son William John Murphy was married to Catherine Redmond in 1882 at Ste. Marguerite just prior to his departure for Neillsville, Wisconsin with his father and siblings.  Catherine Redmond was the daughter of Michael Redmond and Martha Cates of Caratunk, Maine.  Michael Redmond was the son of Hugh Redmond and Marcelline Fitzsimmons of Concession St. Thomas of Ste. Marguerite.  William John Murphy often went to Maine to work at cutting heavy timber in the winter and then run the logs down the Kennebec River when the spring thaw came. Prior to his marriage, in June 1882, he purchased 40 acres in Weston Township.  He then sold this farm to John McLane.  Then in 1883, William Murphy purchased another 40 acre farm in Weston Township.  William Murphy and Catherine Redmond Murphy had three children born in Weston Township.  Shortly after the birth of their third child in 1886, Catherine Redmond Murphy died.  William Murphy is listed in the 1885 Wisconsin State Census as residing in Weston Township as head of a household of 4. In 1885, he purchased another farm in Weston Township and by 1895, his father Miles Murphy was living on it.  Shortly after the birth of their third child in 1886, Catherine Redmond Murphy died.  He married his second wife Catherine McLane in 1891 at Neillsville.  She was the daughter of James McLane and Anastasia O’Connor of Concession St. Alexander in Ste. Marguerite.  She apparently had come to Wisconsin with her first husband Hugh Tackney.  In one of his jobs, William Murphy helped to construct some log trestles on the Great Northern railway near Walla Walla, Washington. William built up a large dairy operation in Wisconsin. After his second wife’s death in 1902, William Murphy migrated to Lawton, Oklahoma.  He stayed in Lawton for a couple of years.  He did a bit of “horse trading” in business properties.  He owned and operated a small frame structured hotel called the “Old Southern,” right up from the Frisco depot.  He had title to a number of lots and business properties in downtown Lawton.  He soon sold his Lawton properties in favor of investing in the new town of Chattanooga, Oklahoma.  William Murphy owned and operated the “OK Hotel” in Chattanooga from 1905 to 1910.  By 1906, it had a big saloon alongside and was a very active hostelry. Unfortunately the saloon had to be shut down in 1907 when Oklahoma became a State.  William Murphy married his third wife Ann Woolridge in 1909 at Chattanooga. William Murphy got out of the hotel business around 1914 and moved to a house just west of the old Chattanooga schoolhouse close to his brother John Murphy’s house. At one time he owned 2 or more farms in the surrounding area.  He rented them out and finally sold them.  At the age of about 60 he took on the responsibility of main custodial officer (janitor) of the nearby Chattanooga school.  He worked at this occupation for 10 years and then located on a 40 acre farm on the east end of Chattanooga with a nice house which he enlarged somewhat.  He kept a little string of milk cows there for years.  William also maintain 3 rental properties in Chattanooga.  In 1929, he moved to Lawton.  William John Murphy died in 1937 in Chattanooga, Oklahoma.


Their son Moses Murphy followed his father and siblings to Clark County, Wisconsin in 1884.  In 1885, Moses Murphy purchased a farm in Weston Township. This 40 acre farm would remain in the hands of his descendants until modern times. Moses Murphy married Mary Catherine Redmond in 1891 at Neillsville.  Mary Catherine Redmond was the daughter of Richard Redmond and Elizabeth Wilson from Concord, Maine.  Richard Redmond was the son of Hugh Redmond and Marcelline Fitzsimmons of Concession St. Thomas of Ste. Marguerite.  Moses Murphy and Mary Catherine Redmond had three children in Weston Township.  Moses Murphy and his family are listed in the 1900 census in Weston Township.  Mary Catherine Redmond died in 1903 and was buried at St. Mary’s Catholic Cemetery in Neillsville. Moses Murphy was again listed as a farmer in Weston Township in 1910.  Moses Murphy died at the home of his daughter Greenwood, Wisconsin in 1936.  His funeral services were held at St. Mary's Catholic Church at Greenwood with Rev. Father P. T. Weller officiating. He was buried in St. Mary’s Catholic Cemetery in Neillsville.


Their son John Murphy was married to Bridget Jordan in 1883 at Frampton.  Bridget Jordan was the daughter of James Jordan and Catherine Bulger of Frampton Township.  Shortly after his marriage John and Bridget Murphy went to Clark County, Wisconsin in 1883. John Murphy is listed in the 1885 Wisconsin State Census in Weston Township as head of a household of 3.  In 1893, John Murphy had a 40 acre farm in Weston Township.  John and Bridget Murphy had eight children born in Weston Township.  While John Murphy was farming in Christie, Wisconsin (Weston Township) he had a bad accident involving a road grader or some type of road building equipment.  He became crippled from the waist down.  He got around on a strong dining room chair with special footings on the front legs. In about 1905, John Murphy and his family moved to Chattanooga, Oklahoma following his brother William John Murphy.  John bought a farm only a couple of miles northeast of Chattanooga.  Around 1914, he had a business place a few doors down from the Chattanooga Post Office.  He plied his skill as a cobbler and the shoe repairman.  His work was done with minimal use of machinery except for a very large heavy duty sewing machine.  John’s popularity around town lead to his appointment as Justice of the Peace.  His courtroom was his shoe repair and oil distribution shop.  Bridget Jordan Murphy died in 1928 at Chattanooga.  John Murphy died in 1932 at Chattanooga.


Their son Miles Murphy, Junior, came to the Neillsville, Wisconsin area in 1882 with his father and siblings.  He went on to La Crosse, Wisconsin where he married Mary Agnes Conley in 1891.  Miles and Mary Agnes Murphy had three children in La Crosse.  Mary Agnes Conley Murphy died in 1899 at La Crosse.  Miles Murphy is listed in the 1900 census as a ship carpenter in La Crosse.  He and his three children were living in the boarding house operated by his sister-in-law Margarite Conley.  He is listed as a laborer in La Crosse in the 1905 Wisconsin State Census.  Miles Murphy died in 1915 at La Crosse.  His funeral was at the St. James Church with Rev. Murphy officiating.  He was buried at the Catholic Cemetery.


Their daughter Margaret Murphy went to the Neillsville, Wisconsin area with her father and siblings.  She married Bernard Zimmer in 1887 at Neillsville.  She and Bernard had at least six children.  She died in 1914 and was buried in the St. Mary’s Catholic Cemetery in Neillsville. 
Martin O’Brien was born in 1844 in Quebec City.  He was the son of Cornelius O’Brien and Margaret Duggan.  Cornelius O’Brien was first a laborer in Quebec City, but by 1845 he settled on a farm in Cranbourne Township.  Martin O’Brien was engaged in the ship building business in Quebec City in his early life. Martin O’Brien married Mary Ann Garvin in 1868 at Frampton and they settled on a farm in Cranbourne.  Mary Ann Garvin was the daughter of William Garvin and Margaret Gorey who were residents of Cranbourne. Martin O’Brien and his family are found in the 1871 and 1881 Canada census in Cranbourne where he was a farmer. Martin and Mary Ann O’Brien had 8 children born to them while living in Cranbourne.  Martin O’Brien and his family went to York Township of Clark County, Wisconsin in 1882 where he purchased an 80-acre farm. Martin O’Brien, Mary Ann Garvin O’Brien and their son William and his wife are found on a farm in York Township of Clark County, Wisconsin in the 1905 Wisconsin State Census. Mary Ann Garvin O’Brien died at her home in York in 1924.  Her funeral was held at St. Mary’s Catholic Church in Neillsville with Rev. P. Weber officiating.  Martin O’Brien died in 1933 at Neillsville.


Bernard Cassidy was the son of Edward Cassidy and Margaret McCarthy.  His father Edward Cassidy was a farmer at lot 1 of range 5 of Frampton Township.  Bernard Cassidy married Anastasia Redmond in 1871 at Ste. Marguerite.  She was the daughter of Hugh Redmond and Marcelline Fitzsimmons of Concession St. Thomas in Ste. Marguerite. They came to Neillsville, Wisconsin about 1883 and settled on a farm in Weston Township.  Bernard Cassidy is listed in the 1885 Wisconsin State Census as residing in Weston Township as head of a household of 6.  Bernard Cassidy and his family are found in the 1900 census in Weston Township.  Bernard Cassidy died at his home in Weston Township in 1909.  His funeral was held at St. Mary’s Church with Rev. Dorrenbach officiating. Anastasia Redmond Cassidy and her son Edward are found in the 1910 census in Weston Township. Anastasia Redmond Cassidy died of heart failure at her home in Weston in 1913.  The funeral services were at St. Mary’s Church in with  officiating. Their two surviving children were Edward Cassidy who remained in Weston and Frances Cassidy La Fleur who lived nearby.


Hugh Redmond and Marcelline Fitzsimmons were both born in County Wexford, Ireland somewhere near Enniscorthy.  They married in County Wexford and their first two children were born in Enniscorthy.  They came to Lower Canada in about 1831 and settled on a farm in Concession St. Thomas of Ste. Marguerite.  They had five more children born in Ste. Marguerite.  Hugh Redmond and his family were still living in Ste. Marguerite in the 1881 Canada census. They probably wetn to Clark County, Wisconsin in about 1883 to live near their son Richard Redmond. They may have lived with their daughter Anastasia Redmond and her husband Bernard Cassidy.  Marcelline Fitzsimmons Redmond died at Neillsville in 1887.  Hugh Redmond died at Neillsville in 1894.  They are both buried in the St. Mary’s Catholic Cemetery in Neillsville.
Their son Richard Redmond married Elizabeth Wilson in 1863 in Quebec City at St. Patrick’s Church.  Elizabeth Wilson was the daughter of Andrew Wilson and Margaret Jane Bradley who were residents of Concession St. Thomas of Ste. Claire.  They had 2 children born in Ste. Marguerite and baptized at Frampton.  In about 1868, Hugh Redmond and his family went to Concord, Maine where 4 more children were born to them.  Richard Redmond and his family are found in the 1870 census in Bingham of Somerset County, Maine. Richard Redmond emigrated to Clark County, Wisconsin before 1883.  He is listed in the 1900 census as a farmer in Weston Township.  Richard Redmond and his wife and son Hugh Redmond moved to Portland, Oregon were they are found in the 1910 census.  They later returned to the Neillsville, Wisconsin area.  Richard Redmond died in 1920 at the home of his son in Weston.  His funeral was held at St. Mary’s Catholic Church with Rev. P. Weber officiating.  He was buried in the St. Mary’s Catholic Cemetery in Neillsville.  Elizabeth Wilson Redmond died in 1931 at the home of her daughter in Greenwood, Wisconsin.  The funeral services were held at her daughters home and she was buried in Neillsville.


Peter Murphy was the son of James Murphy and Honorah Doyle of range 3 of Frampton Township.  He was the grandson of early Frampton settler Peter Murphy.  He married Marie Clara St. Hilaire in 1885 at Notre Dame Victoire.  Peter and Marie Clara Murphy went Neillsville, Wisconsin in 1886.  They had six children all born in Neillsville.  Marie Clara St. Hilaire Murphy died in 1895 at her home in Neillsville.  Peter Murphy and his children were found in Neillsville in the 1895 Wisconsin State Census.  Peter Murphy and his family are found in the 1910 census in the 15th Ward of La Crosse, Wisconsin where he was a railroad laborer.


Michael Shea was born in 1844 at Frampton. His parents were James Shea and Ellen Hughes who were residents of Frampton Township.  He went to Clark County, Wisconsin in 1886.  He worked as a laborer.  In the 1900 census, he was living in Weston Township where he was a baorder.  He died in 1909 at Chippewa Falls, Wisconsin. His funeral was held at St. Mary’s Catholic Church.  He was buried in St. Mary’s Catholic Cemetery.  His sister was Ellen Shea, who was the wife of Patrick Hughes of Grant Township.


Andrew Murphy was the son of Thomas Murphy and Mary O’Farrell of range 4 of Frampton Township.  Thomas Murphy was the brother of Miles Murphy and Mary O’Farrell was the sister of Bridget O’Farrell.  He married Ann Quigley in 1888 at Frampton.  Ann Quigley was the daughter of James Quigley and Ann Miller of range 1 of Frampton Township. Ann Quigley died before 1900 as in that census Andrew Murphy was listed as a single head of household living next to both the John McLane household and the Moses Murphy household in Weston Township.  Andrew Murphy died at the home of his cousin, Margaret Murphy Zimmer in Neillsville in 1902. His funeral was held at St. Mary's Catholic Church with Rev. Father Garrity officiating.  He was buried in the St. Mary’s Catholic Cemetery in Neillsville.


When you examine the 1893 plat maps for the farm properties in and around Christie, Wisconsin (just North of Neillsville) you can easy find the surnames of many of the Frampton Irish that about 15 years earlier could be found on the farms in Concessions St. Alexander, St. Edouard, and St. Thomas of Ste. Marguerite, Quebec. It was if the entire "neighborhood" of family and friends had been transplanted from location to the next. In just one more generation, many of these families wouldl ultimately forget all about their Quebec origins.


Green Bay Colony Nov 30, 2012

The theme of this blog is "Green Bay." When Americans think about the geographic area of Green Bay, Wisconsin, they most often think of the football champions the Green Bay Packers and their fans who often wear strange looking cheese shaped hats and are sometimes referred to as "cheese heads." But the Green Bay area has much greater significance to the Frampton Irish than just football. The bay of Green Bay is located in Northeast Wisconsin where it also borders on the state of Michigan before it joins Lake Michigan on the north. On the east side of the bay is the Door County peninsula in Wisconsin and on the northwest side is Menominee County, Michigan. Both these counties were significant emigration destinations for the Frampton Irish. In past blogs, I have written about the Frampton Irish that emigrated to California and Maine. These areas were what I have come to refer to as "Frampton Irish colonies." Such colonies were places where many Frampton Irish family and friends who lived near each other in Frampton seemed to relocate as a unit to the new location and ended up living near each other in the new location. Further, they continue to inter-marry in the new location. So this blog is about the Green Bay-Lake Michigan colony.

I first learned of the Frampton Irish in the Green Bay-Lake Michigan area through fellow Frampton Irish researcher Ginny Haen. She had shared a great deal of her research on these families with me. I also have read through her book Irish-Scotch Families from Frampton & Standon, Dorchester County, Quebec to Jacksonport, Door County, Wisconsin, USA (mid to late 1800s). I also had the privilege of meeting Ginny twice at the Salt Lake City Family History Library while we were both doing research. I had Ginny review this blog and she provided a great deal of additional information and suggestions for enhancing it. So this blog is sort of written by both of us.

While Ginny had found many Frampton families in the Door County, Wisconsin area, I decided that in preparation for this blog, I would search through the 1900 U.S. census to see just how many Frampton Irish families and individuals I could identify in the Green Bay-Lake Michigan colony. The 1900 U.S. census provides the month and year of birth of each person listed and also identifies the year in which they immigrated to the U.S. This search enabled me to make a list of the families and address the years of out-migration from Frampton. I conducted my search by focusing on Door County, Wisconsin and Menominee County, Michigan. I searched for all persons born in Canada and then because of my knowledge of Frampton Irish surnames, I was able to discern which may have been Frampton Irish families. I also supplemented this research with some searches in Wisconsin and Michigan vital records recently placed on-line on the FamilySearch.org website. My research coupled with Ginny’s information reveals the story of emigration to the Green Bay-Lake Michigan area in Door County, Wisconsin and Menominee County, Michigan.

Out-migration of Frampton Irish families to the Green Bay area would occur as early as 1867 and continue through 1900. By the 1900 U.S. census, about 35 Frampton Irish families and individuals would be located in the Green Bay-Lake Michigan area. Like the emigration to Maine, the initial attraction to the Green Bay area was jobs in the timber and lumber industry. From my research on another un-related book, I have determined that the period of 1850 to the 1880s were "boom times" for logging in Northern Wisconsin and Northern Michigan. Every Frampton Irish colony can point to one or two pioneering emigrants. In other words, the first families to move from Frampton to the new location. After that, much of the out-migration could be classified as "chain migration" as many of the family and friends of the pioneering emigrants would follow to the new location for the jobs and land acquisition opportunities it may hold for them

Ginny reports in her book that her 3rd great uncle, John Tolerton Bagnall went to Jacksonport, Wisconsin in 1867. He became a timber cruiser, purchased land and hired men to help remove the timber. He later would have timber operations in Upper Michigan. He and his wife Eliza Rutherford would follow the timber and Eliza often cooked for the men in the lumber camps.

Joseph Smyth/Smith, son of Thomas Smyth/Smith and Mary Ann Wilson, was another pioneering emigrant. His siblings John, Joshua, Abraham, and Alice would also emigrate Door County, Wisconsin and Menominee County, Michigan. The History of Door County offers a narrative of Joseph Smyth/Smith who first went to Cheboygan, Michigan in 1866. The Narrative provides:

Among the Canadians was Joseph Smyth who later became known as "the cedar king" of Door County. For many years he did business of $180,000 per year. In 1879 he shipped seventy cargoes of cedar stuff and cordwood. In the 80s he and Warren Bailey had a very large camp on Drummond Island in Lake Huron. Ten thousand dollars worth of supplies were shipped up to the camp, including 200 barrels of flour grown in Jacksonport and ground in Sturgeon Bay.

These two pioneering emigrants probably were able to offer jobs to their relatives and friends in Frampton. They were probably able to paint a picture of prosperity in the United States that could not be sustained in Frampton and many families would follow. The following is a list of the Frampton Irish families found in the Green Bay Area (mostly in the 1900 U.S. census).

Joseph Smyth/Smith and his wife Margaret Forsythe Wilson were found in Jacksonport, Wisconsin where he was a farmer. He emigrated to the U.S. in 1866.

John Wilson (brother of the above Margaret Forsythe Wilson) and his wife Jane Lightfoot were found in the 1880 U.S. census in Jacksonport where he was a lumber dealer. They went to Wisconsin in 1866. In the 1900 U.S. census he and his family were found in Esmen Township of Livingston County, Illinois where he was a farmer.

John Tolerton Bagnall’s widow Eliza Rutherford Bagnall was found in Jacksonport where she was a farmer. He went to Wisconsin in 1867. According to his obituary, he died in 1897 in Rock, Delta County, Michigan after a fall at the home of his son G. Harry and was brought back to Jacksonport for burial. Many of his descendants still have summer/retirement homes in Door County.

Andrew Bartholomew was found in Spalding of Menominee County, Michigan in the household of John Bagley. He went to Michigan in 1870. He was the son of Frampton residents Andrew Bartholomew and Agnes Morrow.

John Kell and Anna Maria Smyth were found in Spalding, Michigan where he was a farmer. He and his wife went to Michigan in 1871. Anna Maria Smyth was a relative of the above Joseph Smyth.

Henry Forsythe Wilson and Sarah Maria Smyth were found in Jacksonport where he was a farmer. He was the brother of the above Margaret Forsythe Wilson. They went to Wisconsin in 1873. Quite a few descendants of this family still live in Door County, many in the Jacksonport area.

William Kell and Margaret Jane Bagley were found in Spalding, Michigan where he was a farmer. They went to Michigan in 1873.

William Bagley and Maggie Bagley were found in Stephenson, Michigan. They appear to have been married in Michigan around 1873. An 1887 birth record found for their daughter Irene Bagley indicated that the mother’s name was Maggie Bagley. It is not certain if this was her married name or maiden name. However, the 1900 census indicates that she was born in Michigan in 1863 which pre-dates the arrival of the Frampton Irish in Michigan.

John Bagley’s widow Alice Anderson Smyth was found in Menominee, Michigan where she had a boarding house. John Bagley and his family went to Jacksonport, Wisconsin in about 1874. He died in Jacksonport in 1887. Alice Anderson Smyth was the sister of the above Joseph Smyth/Smith. In 1910 Alice was in Detroit living with her two daughters: Mary W, a dressmaker and Ruth A., a milliner. In 1920 she was living in Baton Rouge, Louisiana with her son G.R. Bagley, his wife and young daughter, as well as her son F. Samuel and daughter, Ruth.

For the most part, all of the Frampton Irish emigrants to the "Green Bay-Lake Michigan colony" were Protestants. The exception to this was Catholic Nicolas Fitzsimmons who reported in the 1900 census that he emigrated to the U.S. in 1874. He married in Wisconsin and he and his family were found in Jacksonport. His parents John Fitzsimmons and Catherine Doran went to Wisconsin in 1898 and were found living in Nicolas Fitzsimmon’s household in 1900. Nicolas Fitzsimmons wife Annie is found as head of household in Jacksonport in the 1910 census. However, Nicolas was not listed in the household. Her mother-in-law Catherine Doran Fitzsimmons was living in her household. Catherine’s husband John Fitzsimmons died on November 12, 1905 and was buried at St. Michael’s Catholic cemetery in Jacksonport. Nicolas Fitzsimmons reportedly died in 1919 in San Francisco, California

Isaac Bagley, son of John and Alice (Smith) Bagley, went to the U.S. in 1875, probably with his parents and family. He married Mary/Minnie Bagnall, daughter of Sam and Alice (Wilson) Bagnall, in Jacksonport in 1893. He and his family were found in Stephenson of Menominee County, Michigan where he was a blacksmith. They later resided in Gaastra, Iron County, Michigan. Isaac and Minnie have a granddaughter still living in Escanaba, Delta, Michigan.

George Kell and Sarah Jane Smyth were found in Spalding, Michigan where he was a farmer. They went to Wisconsin in about 1877 and first settled in Little River, Wisconsin where their first three children were born. Sarah Jane Smyth was related to the above Joseph Smyth/Smith.

Joseph Kell and Elizabeth O’Hara were married in Quebec in about 1867. She may have been Catholic. Their first four children were born in Frampton. Three of them were baptized at the St. Edouard de Frampton Catholic church and one was baptized at Springbrook Anglican church. They went to Wisconsin in 1877 and first settled in Little River, Wisconsin. In the 1900 U.S. census, they were found in Spalding, Michigan where Joseph Kell was a farmer.

Margaret Hossack Wilson was the widow of East Frampton storekeeper Joseph Wilson. Joseph Wilson died in Frampton in 1855. Margaret continued to operate the East Frampton store until 1873 when she went to Wisconsin. She was found in the household of her son-in-law Joseph Smyth (the same as above) in Jacksonport.

Hugh Bagley and Rebecca Moyles were married in Michigan in about 1880. Rebecca Moyles was the daughter of Daniel Moyles and Isabella Hall of Standon Township, Quebec. They were found in Spalding, Michigan where Hugh was a farmer.

John Foster and Hannah Maria Harper were found in Spalding, Michigan where he was a laborer. They went to Michigan in 1880.

Edward Sargeant and Catherine Lightfoot and their family went to Wisconsin in 1881. Edward Sargeant died in 1893. Catherine Lightfoot Sargeant was found in the household of her son John A. Sargeant in Jacksonport, Wisconsin. A nephew of John Sargeant was also living there. His name was Henry McNeely who was the son of James McNeely and Henrietta Sargeant (John’s sister). John Sargeant raised Henry McNeely to adulthood. Henry McNeely died at about age 24 in Montague, Michigan. James McNeely was the son of James McNeely and Isabella Bradley of Frampton.

Joshua Smyth/Smith and Sophia Osburn Smyth were second cousins and were related to the above Joseph (Joshua and Joseph were brothers) Smyth/Smith. They went to Wisconsin in 1883. They were found in Jacksonport, Wisconsin where Joshua was a farmer. They later relocated to Upper Michigan where both died in Wilson, Michigan.

John Bagley married Isabella Moyles in Michigan in about 1882. Isabella Moyles was the daughter of Daniel Moyles and Isabella Hall of Standon Township, Quebec. They were found in Spalding, Michigan where John was a farmer.

George Bagnall and Louisa Sargeant had gone to Wisconsin in 1883, probably with his parents.. They were married in Jacksonport, Wisconsin in 1888. They were found in Jacksonport, Wisconsin in the 1900 census. They had an adopted son named Edward McNeely. His birth date was recorded in the census as November 1887 with birthplace in Michigan. He reportedly had been in trouble with the law as he was confined in the Industrial School at Waukesha, Wisconsin in 1902. A birth record was found for a James E. McNeely dated November 3, 1887 in Wilson, Michigan. This was the son of James McNeely and Henrietta Sargeant, as identified above.

Samuel Bagnall and Alice Anderson Wilson went to Wisconsin in 1883 with their family. Samuel died in Jacksonport, Wisconsin in 1891. His widow Alice Wilson Bagnall was found in Jacksonport living in the household of her son John Thorp Bagnall. In 1920, Alice was still in Door County, then later went to Gaastra in Iron County, Michigan to be with daughter Minnie and Isaac Bagley. Alice died in December of 1930.

James Reynolds and Ann Jane Hill were married in Quebec in about 1874. James Reynolds was the son of John Reynolds and Anne Reynolds of Frampton. James and Ann Jane Reynolds went to Wisconsin in 1883. They were found in Jacksonport, Wisconsin where James was a farmer. They had two adopted children in their household, Stewart Kingston and Jennie A. Kingston. Percival Stewart Kingston was the son of Andrew Kingston and Isabella Scott of Frampton. Jennie A. Kingston was probably Ann Jane Kingston who was the daughter of Hugh Henry Kingston and Mary Reynolds of Standon Township, Quebec. This Mary Reynolds was James Reynolds sister and she died in Frampton in 1890. Another child named Sarah Alesa Kingston was also associated with the Reynolds household. She was the daughter of Andrew Kingston and Isabella Scott. Sarah married the longtime and popular pastor Rev. Joseph Jameson of the Holy Name Episcopal Church in Jacksonport and has descendants there yet.

John Smyth/Smith and Rebecca Smyth/Smith were second cousins and relatives of the above Joseph Smyth/Smith. John was a brother of Joseph, Joshua, Alice Bagley, and Abraham. They came to Jacksonport, Wisconsin in 1883. They were found in Jacksonport where John was a farmer. Rebecca’s parents George S. Smyth and Eliza Stewart were living in their household. They had arrived in Wisconsin in 1888. Some descendants of John and Rebecca still live in Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin.

Thomas McNeely and Elizabeth Bradley were found in the 1894 Michigan state census in Spalding, Michigan. They had gone to Michigan in 1883. Elizabeth Bradley McNeely died in Spalding in 1896 and Thomas McNeely died in Spalding in 1900, both before the 1900 U.S. census was taken. Elizabeth Bradley had been previously married to Thomas Bagley. Thomas McNeely and Elizabeth Bradley’s son Thomas McNeely, Jr. was married to Mary Ann Kingston in 1896 in Wilson, Michigan. Mary Ann was the daughter of Andrew Kingston and Isabella Scott.

William J. Smyth and Eliza Marie Bagley had gone to Michigan in 1883. They were married in Escanaba, Michigan in 1885. They were found in Spalding, Michigan where he was a farmer.

George Bagnall and Sarah Bagley and their family went to Jacksonport, Wisconsin in May 1884. They were found in Jacksonport where George was a farmer.

Richard Tolerton Bagnall and Mary Dickson went to Wisconsin in 1884, probably with his parents George and Sarah above. They were found in Jacksonport, Wisconsin where Richard was a farmer. Brother Thomas and sister Anne also came in 1884 with the family.

Thomas Corrigan and Isabella Scott went to Michigan in 1884. They were found in Spalding, Michigan where he was a farmer. Thomas’ father James Corrigan had gone there with them and was living in their household.

Hugh Henry Sargeant and Adelaide Anderson and their family went to Jacksonport, Wisconsin in July 1884. Hugh’s son George Bagnall Sargeant went with them. Adelaide Anderson Sargeant died in Jacksonport in 1886. Hugh Sargeant died in Marinette, Wisconsin in 1896. Descendants of George Bagnall Sargeant still reside in Door County today.

John Scott and Mary Ann Kell were married in Spalding, Michigan in 1898. Nothing more has been found on this couple.

John Thorp Bagnall and Alicia (Lillian) Harper came to Wisconsin in 1900. They were found in the 1905 Wisconsin state census in Sevastopol of Door County, Wisconsin. Alicia’s parents William Harper and Marie Jane Sargeant were living in their household. Marie Jane Sargeant’s obituary said that William Harper died in Sawyerville, Quebec in 1910 and she also was buried in Sawyerville.

Mary Bagnall, sister of George, Sam and John Tolerton Bagnall came to Jacksonport, Wisconsin with her husband, the Rev. Charles Thorp (Episcopal) in about 1878. The Charles Thorp family is found in the 1880 census in Jacksonport. Rev. Thorp had parishes in southern Wisconsin.

Abraham Smyth/Smith, brother of Joseph, Joshua, John and Alice Bagley was in Wisconsin by 1876. Brother Edward Smyth/Smith was ready to bring his family to Jacksonport when he died suddenly in 1893.

About 90 miles northwest of Menominee County, Michigan is Houghton County, Michigan. One significant Frampton Irish family ended up settling there. This was the family of Robert Bagley and Mary Ann Ford Bagley. Robert Bagley was the son of John Bagley and Ann Holmes. Mary Ann Ford was the daughter of Robert Ford and Elizabeth Hornibrook. Mary Ann Ford was the first cousin once removed of Henry Ford, of Ford Motor Company fame. Their oldest son John Bagley was in Michigan as early as 1876 when he married Margaret Anne Haslet, another Frampton Irish person. John Bagley was a mine contractor in Calumet of Houghton County, Michigan in 1880. By 1900, John Bagley was a railway supply businessman. Shortly after that he would become the superintendent of the Tacoma Eastern Railroad in Tacoma, Washington. Later he would be president of the Cascade & Mineral Lake Lumber Company, president of the Bagley Grader Company, and director of the National Bank of Tacoma. John Bagley’s sister Sophia Bagley married Daniel Moyles, a Frampton Irish person, in 1877. Daniel Moyles and his family were found in the 1900 U.S. census in Laurium of Houghton County, Michigan where he was a carpenter. Brother Robert Bagley was married to Hattie Deacon in Menominee, Michigan in 1891. By 1900 he and his family had moved to Tacoma, Washington where he was a machinist. Brother Henry Ford Bagley married first cousin Rosa Ann Bagley, who was the daughter of Isaac Bagley and Elizabeth Rothwell, in Marshall, Michigan in 1888. They were found in Owosso of Shiawassee County, Michigan where Henry was an engineer. Robert Bagley and Mary Ann Ford joined their children in Michigan in 1893. Robert Bagley died in 1893 in Owosso, Michigan. His widow Mary Ann Ford Bagley was found in Owosso in 1900 where she was recorded as a "capitalist."

Many of the Frampton Irish men of Door County were farmers. On several plat maps (supplied by Ginny Haen) from 1886 to 1899 are show a number of the names of Frampton Irish men whose farms were in close proximity to one another in the center of Jacksonport township just outside the town of Jacksonport. Even the one Catholic family, Nicolas Fitzsimmons, lived near the others. It is as if neighbors in Frampton were now neighbors in Jacksonport.

In the winter season, these men went to the Upper Peninsula of Michigan to work in the logging industry. It was about 14 miles across Green Bay from Door County to Menominee County, but about 100 miles by land. There was a regular road across the ice in winter lined with evergreen trees and a stage line made regular crossings.

The Holy Nativity Episcopal Church was the first congregation of most of the Frampton Protestants. For many year, Rev. Joseph Jameson was the Rector of this church. His wife was Frampton Irish descendant Sarah Alesa Kingston. Many Frampton Irish are buried in the cemetery of that church. The Methodist Church came a few years later and some of those who had been Episcopal came over to that church such as the Bagnalls and the Wilsons. Those people were buried in Lakeview Cemetery. The land for the Methodist Church was donated by Frampton Irish Joseph Smyth. The Catholics (Fitzsimmons) were buried in the St. Michael’s Cemetery right next to their church.

The Frampton Irish of the Green Bay-Lake Michigan colony contributed greatly to the history of that region and to American history in general.


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